What is elbow arthroscopy?

Orthopedic surgeons generally carry out elbow surgery after conducting   known as arthroscopy for studying the condition of a joint and for ascertaining whether elbow replacement is unavoidable.  The term arthroscopy means looking into the inside of a joint. Arthroscope is a special camera intended to be inserted into the joint for viewing the details of the inside by the surgeon through a monitor placed before him.  With the help of this video the surgeon carries out the inspection remotely controlling the miniature surgical instruments inserted into the joint for elbow surgery.

All you need to know about elbow replacement

As arthroscope is a thin instrument, the surgeon needs only small incisions near the joint rather than large incisions used in the conventional surgical procedures. The pain of this surgery will be very less and the blood loss will also be less. Another benefit is that the recovery period of arthroscopic surgery will also be less. Elbow arthroscopy came into existence from 1980 onwards. This procedure has undergone major changes during these years as new instruments and new techniques are introduced one after the other.

Anatomy

Elbow is a complex joint which is the meeting point of three bones namely the humerus, the ulna and the radius.  The end portions of the above bones which meet at elbow joint are covered with articular cartilage. This cartilage is a natural substance which acts as a soft cushion for absorbing the forces getting applied in the joint.  A smooth membrane known as synovial membrane covers the remaining surfaces inside the joint. This membrane secretes a small amount of fluid needed for lubricating the cartilage and for eliminating frictional forces that may be developed inside the joint. As the elbow joint is a complex one, the surgery for elbow replacement has to be carried out by an experienced surgeon with utmost care and dedication.

Structures inside the knee joint

Articular cartilage: The back of the patella and the end portions of tibia and femur are covered by articular cartilage.  This is a slippery substance that allows your knee bones to glide smoothly as you bend or change the position of your leg.

Synovium: Synovium is a thin lining surrounding the knee joint. A fluid release by this lining lubricates the cartilages and eliminates friction during movement.

Meniscus: these are wedged pieces of meniscal cartilage also known as shock absorbers as they absorb the shock between femur and tibia. This is a tough and rubbery substance which provides cushioning effect providing stabilization to the joint and is different form articular cartilage.

Ligaments: Bones are connected to other bones with the help of ligaments. There are four ligaments inside a knee joint which act as strong ropes holding the bones together and keeping them in their position. You should visit the best orthopedic doctor Mclean, VA.

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